• research

We study how the structure of biological communities—including both biodiversity and ecological network structure—affects ecological functioning, and how that structure and function are affected by anthropogenic environmental change. A theme running through much of our work is how community structure and interactions between species affect the expression of phenotypic plasticity (dynamic changes in traits, both behavioral and morphological) and the resultant implications for ecological functioning. We largely, but not exclusively, use plant-pollinator interactions as a model system. We are actively engaged in translating our work and synthesizing other science in the service of environmental policy and management.

We use a range of scientific approaches including mathematical modeling, manipulative and comparative field studies, controlled laboratory experiments, population genetics, and DNA metabarcoding. We get particularly excited about research that integrates multiple approaches.

For more detail on specific research areas, click on the links below:

Bee and wildflower
networks
2499
wild flower meadow
Research